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Notable instances where the Simulator was recognized in some way

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Popular Science 50 Best Sites of 1998

"Congratulations! You now belong to a very exclusive group. I'm thrilled to inform you that Solar System Simulator has been named as one of POPULAR SCIENCE magazine's 50 Best Of The Web for 1998. This award is the first in what will be an annual event to recognize the excellence of selected Internet sites devoted to science and technology."


Kudos icon Mac's Pick of the Week, 30 August 1998

"This is to inform you that your site has been picked as one of "Mac's Picks of the Week". Sites picked as one of my "Picks of the Week" are picked solely on their merit as being interesting, informative, useful, or just plain fun to the web community at large. The main criteria for those pages picked is that they must be able to be visited by all members of a household, regardless of age or sex."


Kudos icon Lockergnome Newsletter Featured Site, 29 August 1998

"Your site, or selected software on your site, will be featured in an upcoming issue of Lockergnome's Windows 95/98/NT newsletter. This e-mail newsletter, with a readership of 130,000+ users, informs people of new Windows 95/98/NT software, breaking computer-related news, interesting tips and tricks regarding those 32-bit Operating Systems, and much more.

Cloudy nights don't bother me; I can still see the planets in the sky without a telescope. No, I'm not a super human, I just know of this crazy little web page that'll simulate the solar system (in relationship with different points of view). It's actually quite keen, especially if you're a novice stargazer trying to figure out what this stuff actually looks like. Change a variety of options and it'll spit out a graphic for you in seconds. Scope it out!"


Kudos icon Slavek's ultimate guide to science / space art July 1998

(no description given)



Kudos icon Popular Science Web Watch, June 1998

"Views of objects in our solar system from the other planets and moons."


Britannica Internet Guide, May 1998 (for Cassini home page)

"Greetings Webmaster! As you may already know, your Web site has been selected for inclusion in the Britannica Internet Guide (http://www.ebig.com). That's really something to crow about, and we're pleased to provide you with an easy way to do it."


Kudos icon 4Kids top Site, 10 May 1998

"Space travel is a dangerous, if not impossible, task for ost, but thanks to NASA's Solar System Simulator, star-hopping can be as easy as clicking your computer mouse. Shuttle out to http://space.jpl.nasa.gov and see the planets as never before. Like having a planetarium in your own home, the simulator lets you gaze at the sun, moon or stars from a variety of viewpoints. The images are breath-taking and colorful, and will be sure to give you a better understanding of the solar system. Saturn may look cool from Earth, but wait until you see it from Pluto! Still hankering for more galactic fun? The site also has sample scenes, movie clips and a space library. The Solar System Simulator is your chance to get a close-up look at the final frontier."


Kudos icon Eye Candy 1998 Winner

"I am pleased to inform you that your presentation was nominated by a visitor to the review, evaluated by our review panel, and has been selected as a winner of the 1998 eye candy award. Because of the extremely high qualifications for selection as an Eye Candy Award Site, less than 1% of all nominations score high enough to receive this award.

Since this award was started in July 1996, the criteria for the eye candy award has reflected the high standards, exciting new possibilities, and real practicalities of web design. To date, over 50,000 web sites have been reviewed by Eye Candy WWW Site Reviews. About one in every 1000 nominations score high enough to receive this award. We estimate that Eye Candy award-winning web sites rank in top 1% of all sites on the world wide web.

The composition of a web site is evaluated in terms of in its artistic quality, page layout and balance, and use of color. These elements are essential for an eye-catching web site. In fact, an award-winning site is of such significant artistic value that a careful study of their qualities are worthwhile for new and old designers and developers alike. Your site has been evaluated by an exceptional team of fine and computer artists, designers, and new media experts.

Congratulations!
Professor Joseph Broadus
Eye Candy WWW Site Reviews"


Sean's Page Site Review, May 1998

"Call me a geek, but this site rules. I just saw what the Earth will look like from a vantage point on Pluto, at exactly 2 minutes after my 300th birthday (8:45 am GMT, Feb. 25th, 2271) -- you can see Africa real clear. How can you beat that? I mean, c'mon, it's Pluto." (I just had to put this one in - who cares if it's not a big official site review.)


Kudos icon University of Virginia Astronomy Site, May 1998

"View virtually any celestial body (planets, moons) in the solar system from the point of view of any other point. Contains hundreds of spectacular jpeg images from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory."


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PlanetWeb Top Ten Tech Site, April 1998

(no description given)


Kudos icon Silicon Sky online resource

"Created by David Seal, this amazing site generates simulated views of the solar system, planets, satellites, etc. based on your input."


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Pocket Internet Site

"The Pocket Internet [catalogues] Internet Websites which are unusual, creative, though provoking, even bizarre - but always entertaining. Updated every month."


Central Oregon Green Pages Spring 1998 Column Highlight

"Central Oregon Green Pages is here to provide you with information and inspiration to live a healthier, more earth-friendly, and socially responsible life. We believe that, ultimately, what's best for each and every one of us is what's best for our global and local communities, too."


Kudos icon New Scientist Site of the Day, 26 Mar 1998

"From asteroids to 3d spacecraft models this site covers it all. The solar system simulator allows browsers to see planets as they would look from other planets. Other options allow viewers to select date, time and size. This comes pretty close to the best thing I've seen on the web."

"Congratulations! Your site has been chosen as a Site of the Day on Planet Science, the award winning online voice of New Scientist, the world's leading science & technology news weekly.

Site of the Day is a feature in our keysites section which contains a variety of internet materials, including articles about internet related topics and a regular interactive column from our webmaster. After a week's time, your site will be removed from the daily sites page, and be archived in our Hotspots section--Planet Science's picks of the web."


Kudos icon AstroPro WOW Award, 23-29 Mar 1998

Congratulations, David! In recognition of the great job you're doing, SAMADHI: A SPACE LIBRARY has been awarded a WOW - the Astropro Website Of the Week award for March 23-29. The WOW award is given each Monday to an astrological or related website which, by virtue of excellence in content, design and implementation, distinguishes the World Wide Web by its presence."


Kudos icon Astronomical Society of Tasmania HotLink, 23-29 March 1998

"Anyone that has read Arthur C. Clarke's short story 'Transit of Earth' knows that the story is about an astronaut on the Red planet, who manages to see this rare event. Now you can use NASA's Space Simulator to see this same event by entering the following parameters:..."


Kudos icon For Kids Cool Spot, Mar 1998

"Congratulations! Your Web site, Solar Systems Simulator, may be featured in an issue of www.4kids.org. Www.4kids.org is a Universal Press Syndicate (UPS) syndicated feature published by over 150 newspapers in the US and Canada. Each issue is either printed with the comics for the Sunday edition or published in a daily issue each week and has been since May 5, 1996."


Kudos icon Scientific American Pick of the Web, Mar 1998

"To cruise the solar system, you could wait until December 1, 2001, when the Stanford Alumni Association plans to launch six courageous takers 62 miles above the earth's surface for a fleeting experience of weightlessness aboard a specially built spacecraft. Or you could save $98,000 and go to the Solar System Simulator today. This program--which is only a small part of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's site, A Space Library--cranks out spectacular views of the solar system from whatever vantage you choose. To do so, it draws on planet databases, ring models, trajectory maps and the Yale Bright Star Catalog, containing 9,110 objects. Sample images show how varied the results can be: View the earth eclipsing the sun from the moon, or watch Io cross Jupiter, as it did when the Galileo spacecraft first entered orbit around Jupiter. Movies are also available, including one that simulates Cassini's arrival at Saturn. Another page, Cassini Today, updates pictures of the satellite's surroundings every few hours. And the Galileo Today page simulates the scene from this craft every five minutes. "


Kudos icon Monticello Express Review Site, 12 Mar 1998

"Here is a website that will make the opening words of every Star Trek episode you've ever seen come to mind. "Space, the final frontier." For the brave crew of the Starship Enterprise, exploration of space involved the inherent dangers of space flight, as well as the dangers of a universe crawling with Klingons, Romulans, Cardassians and the Borg. For you, space exploration can take place from the comfort -- and relative safety -- of your computer desk.

The Solar System Simulator, operated on the Web by Jet Propulsion Laboratories, affords Web users the chance to view stellar objects from the perspective of a space traveler, giving computer-generated views of what generations to come may see out the porthole of their space cruisers....

The Solar System Simulator is part of a website called "A Space Library," from which you can view solar system maps, rendered backgrounds of the stars, 3d spacecraft model images, artists' renderings of planetary surfaces, NASA mission artwork and find asteroids. All of this is pretty interesting, too."


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PlanetView's #1 Pick of the Month, "Techie" section, Mar 1998

"From solar science to pseudo science, we've got you covered!"


Kudos icon JPL Spotlight Site

"The new, the unique, the memorable among the Laboratory's net offerings."


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Black Bean Studios Daily Roast (Site of the Day), 10 Mar 1998

"Check out this simulator courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The results are so beautiful that it's impossible for us to find fault with anything on the Internet, at least for today."


Kudos icon Yahooligans (Yahoo for kids) "Cool Site" rating, Mar 1998

"Creates a simulated view of any body in the solar system in full-color graphics! You tell it what you want to see, and it will create a picture just for you! A NASA/JPL space site."


Kudos icon Teleport's The Best of Everything, Mar 1998

"Teleport assembled this list of over 500 great web sites to make your web surfing faster and more fun. We created it from your suggestions, other Best Of lists and our own favorites.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory has the ultimate guide to the universe and a Solar System Simulator."


Kudos icon Desktop Journal Internet Hot Spot, Mar 1998

"This site is produced by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Space Library. Users can input a number of variables with convenient pull-down menus to create color views of the solar system and its bodies. You can view any body from any other, display planet and satellite orbits, and choose from a variety of fields of view. The Space Library features renderings of the surfaces of different planets and star maps containing up to 1 million stars. Technical details of the simulator are described, and many movie clips can be viewed."


Kudos icon Netscape Guide's Cool Web Sites, February 1998

"Simulated view of any body in the solar system from any location and time in full-color graphics. A NASA/JPL space site."


Kudos icon Co-nect NewsSite, February 1998

"Ever wonder what the Earth looked like from Mercury on the day you were born? Check out http://space.jpl.nasa.gov to find out. The Solar System Simulator was originally designed to provide animated movies of different space missions. Now available on the web, the simulator is a great way to check out planets, constellations and even satellites travelling through our solar system."


Kudos icon Cool Links List for Kids top ten, February 1998

"The most educational on our Top Ten this week - but soooo cool! Use this site to look at any planet or a moon in our solar system from any angle, from any one of the other planets or moons, at any time, in any year (past, present or future). This site is really neat!"


Kudos icon Mac's Picks of the Week, 11-17 Feb 1998

"Mac's Picks of the Week is a labor of love; a page which recommends sites I have found after searching the net for interesting, useful, and just plain fun sites to visit. It is published each Wednesday morning (New Zealand time, which is GMT plus 12 hours). Good to see you on the net. May your successes grow daily."


Kudos icon Laughin's Site of the Day, 17 Feb 1998

"This solar system simulator at the NASA Web site is like having a planetarium in your own home. By entering any date and time, and the planets you want to view and from where, you will get a colorful display of what you want to be looking at. Find out what Saturn looked like from Earth on your 6th birthday. You can even apply accurate star fields with constellation lines."


Kudos icon Churches.com Site of the Week, 9 February 1998

(No description given)


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BrightNet Pick of the Week, 8 February 1998

"Connecting the people of Oklahoma to the world and to the future."


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Griffith Observatory Star Award, 8-14 Feb 1998
presented by John Mosley, Program Supervisor, Griffith Observatory

Your "Maps of the Solar System" site has been selected to receive the Griffith Observatory Star Award for the week of Feb. 8-14 for excellence in promoting astronomy to the public through the World Wide Web. The Star Award is presented only once a week to a deserving site. Recipients are acknowledged at the Griffith Observatory's Star Award page. You can view other recipients at that location."


Kudos icon QuickTel Hot Site, 2 Feb 1998

"This offering from JPL and NASA allows you to view any planet as seen from any other planet."


Kudos icon CCI Currents Daily News Review, 2 Feb 1998

"There seems to be no end to the great stuff available from the NASA Web site. It's Solar System Simulator allows users to see any of the planets or moons in the solar system as seen from the earth. But that's not all, you can select the date and time, size of the image, plus field of view and more. You'll love it!"


Kudos icon Space Careers Site of the Week, 1 February 1998

"Tired of looking at the planets from Earth? This site from JPL and NASA allows you to view any planet as seen from any other planet. The software can create a color image of any planet or satellite as seen from any point in the Solar System."


Kudos icon Exploratorium Top Ten of February 1998

"Congratulations, your site has been chosen as one of the Ten Cool Sites for the month of February 1998. Every month, the Exploratorium picks the best in science, art and education. Sites are submitted by visitors to the Exploratorium homepages or suggested by Exploratorium staff. We've been selecting sites since June of 1995. Sites are selected based upon their content, their design and the overall experience of visiting them. Past winners are placed into one (or more) of our twenty-three categories and the end of the month."


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Radionet's Silicon Surf Report Site, 5 Feb 1998

"Then, after you get a fix on things from planet Earth, you can jump on over to the Solar System Simulator and get a view of, well, let's say Saturn as seen from Jupiter on February 5th. There are cool sample movies, too."


Kudos icon Yahoo! "Cool Link," Entertainment/Science, 2 Feb 1998

"Solar System Simulator - simulated view of any body in the solar system from any location and time in full-color graphics. A NASA/JPL space site. "


Kudos icon National Academy Press Cool Science Site, Feb 1998

"We've searched the Net for you and have discovered the coolest sites out there--saving you the exhausting task of sorting through thousands of sites that say they're cool. Start clicking--and start having fun while you learn about topics from DNA to the cosmos."


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Houston Astronomical Society Site of the Week, 2 Feb 1998

"NEAT PAGE! It was listed in the Houston Chronicle newpaper, Business section. You can find it at ww.chron.com (I think). I am the WebMaster for the Houston Astronomical Society and I will put it on our page as "Site of the Week"."


Kudos icon Eisenhower National Clearinghouse Site of the Month, Feb 1998

"The team responsible for developing the Web site for the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse wants to let you know that "http://space.jpl.nasa.gov/" is featured in this month's Digital Dozen. The Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC) collects both physical and virtual resources useful to math and science educators. Each month we choose a baker's dozen of web sites to highlight. The criteria we use to select sites include valuable math and/or science content, teacher appeal, clear navigational aids, and that special something. In addition to being featured in this month's Digital Dozen, your site has been included in our main listing of educational links. You may notice higher traffic to your site as a result of its greater exposure on our web pages."


Kudos icon The Scout Report Research and Education Site, 30 Jan 1998

"The Scout Report is a weekly publication offering a selection of new and newly discovered Internet resources of interest to researchers and educators, the InterNIC's primary audience.

Provided by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory's A Space Library, this site allows users to input a number of variables to create color views of the solar system and any of its bodies. Users can view any body from any other, display planet and satellite orbits, and choose from a variety of fields of view. Sample scenes created with the simulator are also available, several of which are compared with (and almost indistinguishable from) actual images made by the Voyager I and Galileo spacecraft. Additional features include sample Quicktime and MPEG movies, information on the current status of the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft, and a description of the technical details of the simulator."


Kudos icon Net Reader Cyberguide Site, 30 Jan 1998

"Solar System Simulator: Ever wondered Mars looks like as seen from Venus? This simulator from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA allows you to view any planet as seen from any other planet."


Kudos icon WebTrips Site of the Week (Stargazing), 27 Jan 1998

"Congratulations!! Your site is site of the week under category: Stargazing Thanks for contributing to a better sense of community on the web. We value those of you taking the web to the next level. Your site has been selected as a featured site this week on the WebTrips Network(tm) located at http://www.webtrips.com. The WebTrips Network(tm) is a free total entertainment experience which encompasses full animation, entertainment, and music."


Kudos icon Yahoo! Weekly pick, 26 Jan 1998

"Solar System Simulator - for when you're tired of looking at the planets from Earth. ....we stated that we were adventurous, fluent in Russian, and a little spacy. Next thing we knew, we were the fill-in crew on Space Station Mir. Sure, it was fascinating to see the planets from way up there, but, heck, we could have done that a lot more easily using NASA's Solar System Simulator. With the simulator you can choose to view any planet in the solar system as seen from any other planet; gaze at Jupiter from Venus or Earth from Pluto, all without leaving your seat. It's convenient, it's fun, and it doesn't involve eating freeze-dried borscht for three whole months...."


Kudos icon Project Cool Top Sighting, 26 Jan 1998

"Congratulations! As we're sure you're aware, you've created an exemplary website! We here at Project Cool wanted to let you know that you were selected on January 26th because your site makes effective use of the web as a medium and in some ways shows off the web's potential. It is a site that others building for the web can look to for inspiration."


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BetterNet top site, February 1998

"A good educational site for kids' homework."


Kudos icon World Village Family Site of the Day, 26 Jan 1998

"I came across this interesting little site that is a part of the NASA site at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (where the Mars stuff happened this past summer). It is a simulator that allows you to look at any planet or satellite in our solar system from any other planet or body. If you have ever wanted to see what the Earth looked like from Mars, or Jupiter from the Sun, or Mars from the 3rd moon of Saturn, then this is the place for you. It is a nice educational tool for young astronomers, as well as sci-fi buffs. Stop by and visit this most interesting site."


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Six Pack To Go pick, 24 Jan 1998

"Your page was chosen to appear on Six Pack To Go Saturday, 1/24/98."



Kudos icon Yahoo! #1 pick of the day, 22 Jan 1998

"Daily Picks - Solar System Simulator - it's the best view in the house!"


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SpaceViews Space Site of the Week, 19 Jan 1998

"Congratulations! Your Web site has been placed on the SpaceViews Space Sites of the Week list for this week. This is a newly-created list recognizing excellence among space-related Web sites. It's our goal to make this a prime resource for people looking for quality space Web sites."


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Griffith Observatory Star Award, 7-13 Dec 1997
presented by John Mosley, Program Supervisor, Griffith Observatory

"Congratulations! Your new Solar System Simulator site has been selected to receive the Griffith Observatory Star Award for the week of Dec. 7-13 for excellence in promoting astronomy to the public through the World Wide Web. The Star Award is presented only once a week to a deserving site. Recipients are acknowledged at the Griffith Observatory's Star Award page. You can view other recipients at that location."