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Cassini at SOI This is a computer-rendered image of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. The spacecraft is moving out of the plane of the page and to the right (firing to reduce its spacecraft velocity with respect to Saturn) and has just crossed the ring plane. The SOI maneuver, which is approximately 90 minutes long, will allow Cassini to be captured by Saturn's gravity into a 5-month orbit. Cassini's close proximity to the planet after the maneuver offers a unique opportunity to observe Saturn and its rings at extremely high resolution. (P-46507AC) A high resolution TIFF file is available.


Cassini at SOI This is a computer-rendered image of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, showing the path it takes around Saturn during the maneuver. The spacecraft is moving from left to right (firing to reduce its spacecraft velocity with respect to Saturn). The SOI maneuver, which is approximately 90 minutes long, will allow Cassini to be captured by Saturn's gravity into a 5-month orbit. Cassini's close proximity to the planet after the maneuver offers a unique opportunity to observe Saturn and its rings at extremely high resolution. (P-46507AC) A high resolution TIFF file is available.


Cassini during DSM This is an image of Cassini during the Deep Space Maneuver burn, while the main engine is firing. The spacecraft is moving to the right (and, therefore, firing to reduce the spacecraft velocity with respect to the Sun). By David Seal (only available electronically).

A high resolution TIFF file is available.


Cassini Venus flyby There are two flybys of Venus in Cassini's primary trajectory, on 4/21/98 and 6/20/99. This image shows the spacecraft near the cloud-enshrouded Venus. By David Seal (only available electronically).

A high resolution TIFF file is available.


Cassini Earth flyby The flyby of Earth in Cassini's primary trajectory occurs on 8/16/99, just 57 days after the second Venus flyby. This image shows the spacecraft over South America. By David Seal (only available electronically).

A high resolution TIFF file is available.


Cassini Jupiter flyby Cassini's flyby of Jupiter is quite distant, with a closest approach of about 140 Jupiter radii (or 10 million kilometers). This image shows the spacecraft with Jupiter in the far distance. By David Seal (only available electronically).

A high resolution TIFF file is available.